Five Myths Of Heart Health (Guest Post)

Today’s post is a guest post from Millie Bruce (@millie_bruce). She was born in Banffshire, Scotland on August 2, 1944, and earned a basic diploma in Meds at the University of Glasgow in 1962. She has done nourishment counseling and she trained adult nutrition in Adult Daycare Clinics. She worked for clinical journalists and reviewers that wrote and published reports for the New England Journal of Medicine. Now she’s retired and from 2005 to the present she has been a guest journalist for health-related web sites and blogs and forums.

Do You Believe These 5 Myths Of Heart Health?

For both males and females of any age, heart disease is considered the first killer. It kills more people than ALL types of cancer grouped together. If you are black or over 65, your chance of heart disease is greater, but it’s an equal opportunity destroyer. Anyone, anywhere, anytime could have a heart attack [1].

Myth #1: Solely older adults need to worry about their cardiovascular system.

Things that can cause a heart attack accumulate over time. Being a couch-potato, boredom eating, and simply not exercising are bad habits that might begin when we are children. An increasing number of medical doctors are starting to see patients with strokes in their 20s and 30s instead of sufferers generally in their 50s and 60s.

Appearing healthy and at the ideal body weight won’t make you immune to heart attacks. Though both regular exercise and having the right weight help, you still must check your blood cholesterol and blood pressure. A good blood cholesterol (or lipid profile) range is under 200. A very good blood pressure level is 120/80.

Myth #2: I’d feel sick if I had high blood pressure or high-cholesterol.

They name these “silent killers” because they present NO signs or symptoms. One-third of all adults have hypertension. Of those, one-third don’t know they have it.

High cholesterol is a measure of the fats stocked through your blood. Fats may be dropped anywhere in your physique but sometimes congregate around organs, including your heart, with possible genetic predisposition. So even if you’re at a good bodyweight and do not smoke cigarettes, have your blood cholesterol and blood pressure checked regularly. Once may not be enough [2].

Myth #3: Men and women DON’T experience the same signs.

Men and women CAN have exactly the same indicators. However, they typically don’t. Women seem to have the subtler indicators and symptoms while males usually experience the kind of cardiac arrest you see in the movies. But, either gender CAN have any signs or symptoms.

These subtler signs or symptoms, including jaw achiness, nausea, difficulty breathing and excessive weakness, are more likely to get explained away. “My jaw hurt mainly because my lunch time sandwich was on whole-grain bread and I simply had to chew very hard,” or, while clutching their stomach, “I should not have had that extra piece of pizza.”

“Half of women have no chest pain in any way,” declares Kathy Magliato, a heart expert at California’s St. John’s Health Center. Put all the little warning signs alongside one another and listen to your own body.

Obviously, both women and men may experience the “grab-your-chest-and-fall-down-gasping” kind of cardiac event. However, that is not the only way.

Myth #4: Given that my sugar level is in check, my diabetes will not be a heart risk.

While maintaining your blood sugar level with a regular range (80ml-120ml) keeps you healthier and stronger, just having the additional blood sugar in your body takes its toll on arterial blood vessels. Doing exercises and eating healthier helps take control of your type 2 diabetes, but don’t forget to measure your blood pressure level and blood cholesterol, too.

Myth #5: My physician would order exams if I were at risk for heart problems.

Frequently, most of us forget to tell the doctor about the little spasms we’re feeling. The health professionals, with no knowledge of most of the things we deem as unimportant, might pass over heart exams.

“Mammograms and colonoscopies are normally prescribed by doctors,” says Merdod Ghafouri, a cardiologist at Inova Fairfax Medical center in Virginia, [3] “and are usually very important, but heart tests are not normally conducted.” A heart scan can find plaque build-up in your arteries before you even know you have a problem.

Do you have the oil pressure and transmission fluid inspected in your vehicle? Have other precautionary repair done? Doesn’t your only heart deserve as much attention as your car?

Links to Supporting Resources About Heart Disease:

– [1] Family Doctor by American Academy of Family Physicians offers honest medical information and tools for patients. They have a nice write-up covering high cholesterol and arterial blood vessels.

– [2] Mediterranean Recipes is a free website managed by Trisha that gives her cooking enthusiasm to help many people discover how to cook healthy foods to protect against heart diseases. She offers a nice recipes for a healthy heart section.

– [3] Health Central is amongst the most trusted sources of healthcare information and facts and up to date stories that feature a doctor-accredited health encyclopedia of health issues and illnesses. They have a decent write-up about 6 steps to Healthier Heart.

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About me:

M. Bruce (@millie_bruce on Twitter.com) was born in Banffshire, Scotland on August 2, 1944. She earned a basic diploma in Meds at the University of Glasgow in 1962. She has done nourishment counseling and she trained adult nutrition in Adult Daycare Clinics. She worked for clinical journalists and reviewers that wrote and published reports for the New England Journal of Medicine. Now she’s retired and from 2005 to the present she has been a guest journalist for health-related web sites and blogs and forums.

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